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Mental Models

Page history last edited by Heather 12 years, 10 months ago

 

“Mental models are conceptual structures held in each person’s mind that shape the way each person perceives the world and as a result acts in it.”(Flood, 1998) This is obviously an extremely important part in the success of any organization. If an organization has employees that share the same mental model, then it is likely to operate very smooth. In Peter Senge’s Mental Models, he explains that many brilliant ideas never get put into practice. The reason is that the ideas never get translated into action. To avoid this, managers must develop and implementation strategy that describes, in detail, the steps they will take to help gain a shared vision throughout their organizations. Senge stresses the fact that our mental models shape how we act. They are also ingrained into us and can make it difficult for the acceptance of new ideas. Senge continues to explain that employees may be ingrained with mental models that become out of date in the business model (Senge, 1990). It is important for manager to monitor their employees and understand their mental models. Using surveys, meetings, training, the internet, and various other ways, organizations can gain support and learn from employees.

 

Resources


 

Flood, Robert L.(1998) “Fifth Discipline”: Review and Discussion. Systemic Practice and Action Research. Vol. 11, 3. Retrieved from ABI/Inform on November 15, 2008.

 

Senge, P. (1990) "The Fifth Discipline: Art and Practice of the Learning Organization". New York. Doubleday.

 

 

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Comments (1)

Travis McIntosh said

at 5:05 pm on Nov 20, 2008

nicely done, doesn't follow the format of the rest of the wiki pages, but that is a simple change.

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